Project: Quality and Field of Vision: A Review of the Needs of Drivers and Riders

Reference: S322E/VF

Last update: 03/09/2003 15:07:36

Objectives

This projects objectives are to:

* review the literature and any available accident data to determine what is known and what is not known about the influence of optical effects on the perception of road users;
* propose and cost possible means of delivering safety benefits by improving the quality and field of vision in light duty vehicles and protective headgear;
* consider the adequacy of existing controls and the changes to standards and enforcement that might be necessary to realise the benefits identified above; and
* prepare draft documents to amend the appropriate instruments (e.g. standards, directives, and regulations) or develop codes of practice.

Description

This project is reviewing the influence of optical effects on the perception of drivers and riders and the adequacy of existing controls on the quality and field of vision in light duty vehicles and protective headgear. This includes tinting, windscreen condition and the use and positioning of wider structural members to improve crash worthiness, aerodynamics and rigidity.

Contractor(s)

ICE Ergonomics
Holywell Building, Holywell Way, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3UZ
+44 (0)1509 283300

Contract details

Cost to the Department: £191,000.00

Actual start date: 30 April 1999

Actual completion date: 28 February 2002

Publication(s)

Quality and Field of Vision. A Review of the Needs of Drivers and Riders. Final Report
Author: ICE Ergonomics
Publication date: 01/02/2002
Published
Source: Contact steve.gillingham@dft.gsi.gov.uk
More information: http://magpie.lboro.ac.uk/dspace/handle/2134/519

Quality of Motorcyclists Vision. Summary Report
Author: ICE Ergonomics
Publication date: 01/12/2001
Unpublished
Source: Contact steve.gillingham@dft.gsi.gov.uk

Summary of results

  1. The main results were:

    * Tinting - Based on the detection of potential roadway hazards under various lighting conditions, the minimum level of light transmittance could be reduced to between 33.4% and 47%. Dark tints were found not to improve detection of targets in the daytime.

    * Haze - Based on tests using veiling glare luminance (VGL), the inside of windscreens should be cleaned every 859miles or 19 days.

    * Abrasion - Based on VGL tests, windscreens should be considered for replacement at 110,000 miles after installation

    * 'A' Pillar geometry - 'A' pillar obscuration reduces the driver's field of vision to a greater extent in newer, as opposed to older, cars.