Project: TransportEnergy BestPractice Programme Freight Market Audit 2005

Reference: 075 Impact Assesment 2005

Last update: 20/02/2006 15:48:41

Objectives

To assess the current level of awareness of the Programme within the freight industry and to evaluate the effectiveness of the communication materials in conveying best practice information and stimulating uptake. Also, to assess the appropriateness of the variety of channels of communication used.

Description

This project highlights the awareness level of the freight element of the TransportEnergy Best Practice Programme and evaluates the effectiveness of the communication materials in conveying best practice information and stimulating uptake. Also, It assess the appropriateness of the variety of channels of communication used.

Contractor(s)

AEA Technology Environment
Harwell Business Centre, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QJ
+44 (0)1235 432201

Contract details

Cost to the Department: £44,000.00

Actual start date: 15 December 2004

Actual completion date: 01 April 2005

Publication(s)

TransportEnergy BestPractice Programme Freight Market Audit
Author: HI Europe
Publication date: 24/02/2006
£0.00
Source: Department for Transport
More information: http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/freight/research/flrp/transportenergybestpracticeprogrammefreightmarketaudit

Summary of results

  1. In order to put the main findings of this research project into context, we have applied the findings to the AIDA model to understand what the barriers are to the TEBP Programme making more contact with freight operators and to helping these operators make fuel cost savings.


    Awareness

    Interest

    Desire

    Action


    The principle is that in order for the TEBP Programme to get freight operators to improve fuel efficiency and make savings on their fuel costs, they must first be aware of the Programme, must then be interested enough in it to make contact and request publications, be motivated to read them and, as a result, take action.

    Awareness - At 2.0%, the spontaneous awareness of the TEBP Programme is very low indeed. Although the prompted awareness is higher, at 23.0% it is still relatively low. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that, in the majority of cases, the fleet operator only knows the TEBP name and is unable to provide any detail about the Programme's role. This is a disappointing result.

    Interest - Perhaps because of this, only around a third of operators see the TEBP Programme as a credible and reliable source of information. In fact, only 3% of the fleet operators interviewed had rung the TEBP Publications Ordering Line and 4% had made contact at a trade event, i.e. only a small minority of the marketplace.

    Desire - A further barrier exists in the fact that a significant proportion of those receiving publications are unable to provide an assessment of them. This implies that the publications had not been well read and considered and, as a result, no cost savings made. Is this because a lack of awareness and credibility prevents the TEBP publication from being seen as a "must read" publication?

    Action - However, two-thirds of operators receiving TEBP publications had taken the time to read them. In general, they had been very impressed by them. Many had taken effective action saving, on average, saving 6.2% on their fuel costs. The problem is that the lack of penetration of the marketplace left the TEBP Programme making little impact on the overall marketplace.