Project: Private Motorists Survey 2004

Reference: PM04

Last update: 22/09/2005 11:22:09

Objectives

To track customer satisfaction among car drivers and motorcyclists with DVO Group services.
To test customers' reactions to new services and initiatives.

Description

An annual survey of private motorists, based on 1000 face-to-face interviews.

Contractor(s)

MORI (Market and Opinion Research International Ltd)
MORI House, 79-81 Borough Road, London, SE1 1FY
+44 (0)20 7347 3000

Contract details

Cost to the Department: £102,000.00

Actual start date: 01 August 2004

Actual completion date: 31 December 2004

Publication(s)

Private Motorists Survey 2004
Author: MORI
Publication date: 01/02/2005
Source: Published on the VOSA Website
More information: http://www.vosa.gov.uk/vosacorp/contactus/customerfeedback/customersatisfactionsurveys.htm

Summary of results

  1. . Familiarity is up on 2003 for all DVO agencies asked about (DVLA, DSA and VOSA), but this is not matched with improvements in favourability for all (e.g. DVLA).
    . A decline in favourability towards the Post Office, a key intermediary for the DVO Group, may explain falls in satisfaction with certain aspects of motoring e.g. applying for road tax.
    . This year sees an increase in satisfaction with government agencies that deal with motoring. Agencies are viewed as more efficient, easier to contact, and better at keeping things simple than in 2003.
    . The key reasons given for general dissatisfaction and perceptions of poor value for money are poor quality of service/inefficient service, road maintenance in need of improving, and road tax being used for purposes other than maintaining roads.
    . From a prompted list, respondents consider the most important priorities for motoring agencies are to ensure people who drive illegally are prosecuted, and to ensure people are kept informed about laws on motoring.
    . There is considerable enthusiasm for a range of new initiatives and service developments related to motoring. Support is particularly high for radical measures, such as powers to the police to seize vehicles used by uninsured drivers and a database that checks vehicles on the road have insurance.
    . Support is growing for facilities that allow motoring transactions to be conducted online. For example, 72% of internet users say they would be likely to apply online for a replacement driving licence if the facility were available. Furthermore, more than half of all private motorists say they would use some type of Internet service to access government motoring services.