Project: Agricultural Vehicles: Braking Systems

Reference: S280E/VE

Last update: 22/09/2003 10:00:58

Objectives

The project objective is to establish the current performance levels of agricultural vehicle braking systems.

Description

This project investigated the current performance levels of agricultural vehicle braking systems. An accident study by the Institute of Agricultural Medicine (AGMED) for the Department highlighted that the in-service braking performance of tractors and trailers may be inadequate. It also emphasised that little is known about the tyre to road adhesion capability of agricultural vehicles.

There has been a growth in 'high-speed tractors', with design speeds as high as 65 kph, but these are often used with trailers with inadequate braking systems for this application.

Contractor(s)

QinetiQ
Ively Road, Farnborough, Hampshire, GU14 0LX
+44(0)8700 100 942

Contract details

Cost to the Department: £121,810.00

Actual start date: 24 August 1998

Actual completion date: 19 September 2001

Publication(s)

DERA/LSA/LVPS 34/16/6/1. Agricultural Vehicles Braking Systems. Stage 1
Author: DERA / QinetiQ
Publication date: 01/10/2000
Unpublished
Source: Contact: phil.stout@dft.gsi.gov.uk

DERA/LSA/LVPS 34/13/6. Agricultural Vehicles Braking Systems. Summary Report
Author: DERA / QinetiQ
Publication date: 01/06/2001
Unpublished
Source: Contact: phil.stout@dft.gsi.gov.uk

Summary of results

  1. Results indicate that the braking performance of agricultural tractors meet legal requirements at the time of manufacture. A series of tests were conducted with two different tractors and two different trailers. These included Type "O" performance tests in accordance with European Directive 76/432/EEC (Agricultural Vehicles) and Directive 98/12/EC (Motor Vehicles), parking brake assessment, a lane change manoeuvre and a subjective handling assessment on various terrain. A brake fade test was also carried out. However, the in-service performance is not always maintained and leads to some vehicles braking performance being substantially less effective than the type approval requirements. The results also highlighted that the in-service braking performance of a considerable number of agricultural trailers failed to meet legal minimum requirements.