Project: Pedestrian Protection: Test Procedures and Equipment Design

Reference: S220C/VF

Last update: 05/09/2003 13:11:34

Objectives

The project objectives were to:

* evaluate the test devices proposed by the EEVC for the pedestrian protection directive;
* measure the performance of a range of current production cars;
* produce a recommendation on the introduction of a code of practice for bull bars; and
* suggest proposals for improvements to vehicle structures, test methods and possible test for A posts.

Conclusions - The main conclusions were:
* the development of four test tools; two leg tools and two head tools;
* a draft code of practice covering the design and fitting of bull bars was developed, although it was concluded that a legislative approach, involving testing of bull bars on the base vehicle, would offer the best way forward; and
* the test methods and tools have been used as part of the pedestrian NCAP programme. It is anticipated that this will encourage manufacturers to give more emphasis to pedestrian protection during the design process. Research work in this area continued through other projects for general pedestrian protection and test methods for bull bars.

Description

Pedestrian casualties form a large proportion of road user casualties in most developed countries. Car design measures can reduce the severity of pedestrian injuries and will also benefit many pedal cyclists and a small number of motor cyclists involved in accidents with cars. Research into these areas started many years ago and an EEVC Working Group proposed laboratory-type test methods and performance criteria for pedestrian impacts in 1991. These consisted of three separate test procedures to assess a car's performance representing the main phases of an impact; the bumper impact at about knee height, the bonnet leading edge impact at about upper leg/pelvis height and the head impact with the bonnet top.

Following publication of the EEVC proposals, further research was needed to develop the laboratory test tools for everyday use by test houses who undertake the approval testing of vehicles for manufacturers. An assessment was also required of the original 'research' headform test method (developed in the Netherlands based upon a bowling ball). During the duration of the project the issue of Bull-Bars arose and this project included the development of a draft code of practice for the design and fitting of these devices.

Contractor(s)

TRL Limited
Crowthorne House, Nine Mile Ride, Wokingham, Berkshire, RG40 3GA
+44 (0)1344 773131

Contract details

Cost to the Department: £1,704,130.00

Actual start date: 01 April 1992

Actual completion date: 31 January 2001

Publication(s)

Report 480. Pedestrian Protection Test Procedures and Design. Final Report
Author: TRL Ltd
Publication date: 31/01/2001
Source: Contact ian.knowles@dft.gsi.gov.uk

Report 19. Costs and Benefits of the EEVC Pedestrian Impact Requirements
Author: TRL Ltd
Publication date: 01/03/1993
ISBN: ISSN 0968-4093
Source: Contact ian.knowles@dft.gsi.gov.uk

Summary of results

  1. The research made a significant contribution to the work of WG10 and WG 17 resulting in full recommendations for a test method suitable for type-approval of car front ends in terms of their pedestrian friendliness. The finalised proposal involved the development of four test tools; two leg tools and two head tools. TRL took a lead role in developing the two leg tools and assisted in the evaluation of the two head tools.

    The project evaluated the performance of a limited number of production cars. A larger number of cars were evaluated through the EuroNcap test programme which used the pedestrian test methods developed through this project.

    A draft code of practice covering the design and fitting of bull bars was also developed under this project, although it was concluded that a legislative approach, involving testing of bull bars on the base vehicle, would offer the best way forward.

    The project provided technical support for the DETR in negotiations on future pedestrian protection proposals, and offered advice to manufacturers on the implications of the proposals on vehicle design. The scope of the project mostly covered the area of the car forward of the base of the windscreen, although a limited amount of work was also carried out on A-pillar design.