Project: External Control of Vehicle Speed

Reference: S180A/VD

Last update: 03/12/2003 12:48:50

Objectives

The objectives of this project are:

* to assess the costs, benefits and disbenefits of external speed control of motor vehicles;
* to define performance standards for external speed control systems;
* to form links with other research programmes examining the external control of vehicles by using telematics; and
* to define strategies for external speed control systems and estimate the likely costs for the implementation of the chosen strategy.

Description

Context - This project was initiated to examine the implications of applying external speed control to motor vehicles.

Contractor(s)

University of Leeds
School of Geography, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds, LS2 9JT
0113 233 3300

Motor Industry Research Association
Watling Street, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, CV10 0TU
02476 355000

Institute for Transport Studies
University of Leeds, 38 University Road, Leeds, LS2 9JT
Tel: +44 (0)113 233 5325 / 5326

Contract details

Cost to the Department: £558,000.00

Actual start date: 03 February 1997

Actual completion date: 31 July 2000

Publication(s)

External Vehicle Speed Control (Deliverable D17) Final Report: Integration
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 31/07/2000
Unpublished
Source: As author

External Vehicle Speed Control (Phase 2 Results) Executive Summary
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 31/01/2000
Unpublished
Source: As author

External Vehicle Speed Control (Deliverable D11.3) Simulation Modelling on the Network Effect of EVSC
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 31/10/1999
Unpublished
Source: As author

External Vehicle Speed Control (Phase 1 Results) Executive Summary
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 30/06/1998
Unpublished
Source: As author

External Vehicle Speed Control (Deliverable D6) Implementation Scenarios
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 31/10/1997
Unpublished
Source: As author

External Vehicle Speed Control. Executive Summary of Project Results
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 01/07/2000
Unpublished
Source: As author

External Vehicle Speed Control (Deliverable D5) Acceptability of External Vehicle Speed Control
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 01/10/1997
Unpublished
Source: As author

External Vehicle Speed Control (Deliverable D8) Specification of Phases 2 and 3
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 01/11/1997
Unpublished
Source: As author

External Vehicle Speed Control (Deliverable D4) Technical Approaches to the Implementation of External Vehicle Speed Control
Author: MIRA Ltd, University of Leeds
Publication date: 01/10/1997
Unpublished
Source: As author

Summary of results

  1. The major conclusions of this research are that:
    * the autonomous (non-infrastructure based) architecture for External Vehicle Speed Control (EVSC) has significant advantages over the beacon-type system in terms of reliability, flexibility, rapid deployment and reduced public costs;
    * EVSC has very large accident-reduction potential;
    * mandatory EVSC is far more effective than advisory or voluntary EVSC;
    * the Dynamic variant provides the largest accident reduction;
    * benefit-cost ratios for all variants of Mandatory EVSC are greater than 7; and
    * the Mandatory Dynamic system costs little more overall than the Mandatory Fixed system, although the public costs are substantially higher. It therefore has much higher benefit-cost ratios.