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PROTECTED WRECKS IN THE UK

Wrecks designated under the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986:

Controlled Sites

Name of Wreck

Location

Date

History

HMS BULWARK Kent, Sheerness,  50 25.392N 00 39.172E, 100m exclusion WWI On November 26th 1914 the battleship HMS Bulwark whilst at anchorage in Sheerness harbour was completely destroyed by internal explosions in her magazine and shell rooms.  She sank with the loss of 730 lives.
HMS DASHER Strathclyde,  55 37.747N 05 00.953W 200m exclusion WWII The escort aircraft carrier HMS Dasher was destroyed by an internal explosion in the Firth of Clyde, on March 27th1943.  While engaged in deck/ landing operation training the Dasher suffered an aviation/gasoline explosion as a result of which she sank within 3 minutes with the loss of 379 lives. No absolute cause was determined at the time.
HMS FORMIDABLE Devon,  50 13.179N 03 04.071W  300m exclusion WWI The battleship was with the 5th Battle Squadron serving with the Channel Fleet.  She left Sheerness 30th December 1914 to take part in a firing exercise off Portland.  HMS Formidable was struck by a torpedo on the starboard side abreast of her foremost funnel and sank with the loss of 547 lives.
HMS HAMPSHIRE off Marwick Head, Orkney, 59 07.065N 03 23.843W 300m exclusion WWI The armoured cruiser HMS Hampshire was detached from the Grand Fleet for the special duty of conveying Lord Kitchener and his staff to Russia.  She left Scapa Flow on 5th June 1916.  A gale rendered her destroyer escort useless and they returned to Scapa.  HMS Hampshire carried on alone.  At about 7.40 pm she hit a mine and sank within 15 minutes.  Of her complement of 655 men and 7 passengers only 12 men survived.  Lord Kitchener and his staff all perished.
HMS NATAL Cromarty, 57 41.244N  04 05.310W 100m exclusion WWI The armoured cruiser HMS Natal was a unit of the 2nd Cruiser squadron.  On December 30th 1915, she was lying in Cromarty harbour when a fire broke out on board.  Within a short time her magazine exploded and she sank almost immediately.  Of her complement of 815 men the loss of life was heavy, amounting to 421 officers and men.
HMS A7 Plymouth,  50 18.518N  04 17.984W 200m exclusion 1914 On the 16th January 1914 the submarine A7 was carrying out independent exercises in Whitsand bay near Plymouth.  She failed to surfaces following the exercise.  The cause of the accident is not known.  All of her 11 man crew were lost.
HMS VANGUARD Scapa Flow, Orkney,  58 51.400N  03 06.405W 200m exclusion WWI The battleship HMS Vanguard served with the Grand Fleet during WWI until the time of her destruction.  On July 9th 1917, whilst at anchor in Scapa Flow, she blew up, killing all but three of her complement of 670.  No cause of the explosion was ascertained.
HMS AFFRAY Isle of Wight, 49 50.023N  02 34.533W 300m exclusion 1951 During training exercises off the Isle of Wight, the submarine HMS Affray failed to surface.  Whilst the snapping of the mast followed by rapid and uncontrollable flooding provided the most obvious explanation, there was a considerable body of evidence against this conclusion, in particular the absence of any other damage, and the lack of any conclusive evidence as to why it had broken.  All her crew of 75 were lost.
HMS EXMOUTH Grampian,  58 18.467N  02 28.938W 750m exclusion WWII The destroyer HMS Exmouth was sunk by a U-Boat in the Moray Firth on January 21st 1940, with the loss of 189 lives.
HMS ROYAL OAK Scapa Flow, Orkney,  58 55.848N   02 59.001W 200m exclusion WWII The battleship HMS Royal Oak was with the Home Fleet at Scapa Flow.  On the morning of October 14th 1939, the ship was laying at anchor at the extreme end of the harbour at Scapa, when she was struck by a salvo of torpedoes from a U-boat which had managed to penetrate the incomplete coastal defences and attack the battleship. Of her complement of 1,234 officers and men 833 lost their lives.
HM SUBMARINE  H5 Anglesey,  53 05.483N  04 41.975W 300m exclusion WWI On March 6th 1918 the submarine H5 was sunk in collision with an unidentified vessel.  All perished including a United States Naval Officer (US citizen).
UB 81 50 29.442N  00 58.351W exclusion zone 250m from this point 2nd Dec 1917 The UB 81 left Zeebrugge heading for the Channel. On 2nd December 1917, she struck a mine which caused flooding to the stern section. The crew blew the forward ballast tanks in order to raise the bow above water and in this way several crewmen were able to crawl through the open torpedo tubes to the surface. The open torpedo tubes were only just above water level and when a patrol vessel came along side it caused water to rush in the open tubes and flood the vessel, sending it to the seabed along with 29 of the crew.

Designated Vessels

Name of Wreck

Location

Date

History

ATLANTIC CONVEYOR International Waters Falklands Conflict Atlantic Conveyor was the only merchant vessel lost during the Falklands War having been converted to serve as aircraft transport.  Atlantic Conveyor was part of a task group attacked by Argentine aircraft using Exocet missiles and was hit on her port quater starting huge fires.  Twelve men were lost and the ship abandoned.  Atlantic Conveyor later sank whilst on tow in the South Atlantic.
HMS AMPHION North Sea WWI After sinking the German minelayer Konigin Luise on 6th August 1914, HMS Amphion struck one of the mines previously lay by the German ship and was the first British warship lost in WWI.  Amongst the 169 men killed were 18 German sailors rescued from the Konigin Luise.
HMS CURACAO Atlantic WWII HMS Curacao was escorting the Cunard Liner Queen Mary, which was carrying 15,000 US troops through the Atlantic when the two ships collided during an anti-submarine warfare manoeuvre.  HMS Curacao being the much smaller ship was sliced in half and sank with the loss of 338 men on 2nd October 1942.
HMS DELIGHT Portland, Dorset WWII The destroyer HMS Delight was attacked by enemy aircraft off Portland and sank with the loss of 19 lives.  It is thought that she was the first Royal Navy ship lost to aircraft in WWII.
HMS GHURKA Dungeness, Kent WWI The destroyer HMS Ghurka struck a mine off Dungeness and sank on 8th February 1917 with the loss of 75 men.  Only 5 men were rescued.
HMS L24 Portland, Dorset On or about 10th January 1924 The submarine HMS L24 was reported missing off Portland whilst participating in a training exercise.  It is thought that she collided with the battleship HMS Resolution when surfacing after a mock attack on another ship.  HMS L24 sank with the loss of all of her 36 crew members.
HMS LOYALTY Nab Light, Isle of Wight WWII HMS Loyalty was an Algerine-Class minesweeper which sank off Nab Light after she was torpedoed and sunk by U-480.  She had previously participated in the Normandy landings.  She sank with the loss of 20 of her crew on August 22nd 1944.  There were 30 survivors.
HMS PENYLAN English Channel WWII HMS Penylan, a destroyer, was torpedoed by the E-boat S115 whilst escorting the coast convoy PW257 on the 3rd December 1942.  Five officers and 112 ratings were saved, however 38 of her crew lost thier lives.
SS STORAA Hastings WWII SS Storaa was a defensively armed merchant ship and was in convoy under a Royal Navy escort when she was attacked and sunk by E-boat on 3rd November 1943.  She sank with the loss of 21 men.
U 714 Firth of Forth WWII The German U-boat U 714 was sunk by depth charges launched from the South African frigate HMSAS Natal on 14th March 1945.  She sank with the loss of all of her 50 crew.
RFA SIR GALAHAD International Waters Falklands Conflict RFA Sir Galahad was one of the hardworking and versatile RFA LSLs (Landing Ship Logistics). On May 21st RFA Sir Galahad with other vessels was anchored in San Carlos Bay where she came under heavy and sustained enemy air attack. On the 8 June having left St Carlos bay and anchored off Fitzroy Settlement she came under further aircraft attack.  The resulting explosions caused devastating fire and the ship was abandon.  Of her mixed merchant and Royal Navy crew and troops of the Welsh Guards, 50 men were lost and many wounded.
HMS HOOD International Waters WWII On May 24th 1941 the Battlecruiser HMS Hood was in action with the Bismark and was quickly and accurately straddled by the Bismark’s second or third salvo.  A fire broke out and spread quickly.  At 0600 the Bismark had just fired her sixth salvo when the HMS Hood was bent in two by a huge explosion and within three or four minutes had sunk.  Only three survivors were picked up and 1,418 officers and men lost their lives.
HMS PRINCE OF WALES Intenational Waters, Malaysia WWII See entry for HMS Repulse.
HMS REPULSE International Waters, Malaysia WWII On 8 December 1941 the HMS Prine of Wales, HMS Repulse and four destroyers left Singapore to attack Japanese forces reported to be landing troops at Singora and Khota Bharu, Malaya.  They hoped to surprise them shortly after dawn on the 10th.  Unfortunately, the squadron could not be provided with air cover and, when it was sighted by Japanese aircraft on the 9th, the element of surprise was lost.  The squadron altered course that night to return to Singapore but was caught next morning by Japanese bombers and torpedo aircraft.  HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse were sunk with the loss of 762 lives.
HMS SHEFFIELD Falkland Islands Falklands Confict On May 4th 1982 the destroyer HMS Sheffield was hit by an Exocet air-to-surface missile which started uncontrollable fires.  The ship had to be abandoned but did not founder until 9 May.  20 officers and men were lost.
HMS GLOUCESTER International Waters, off Crete WWII The cruiser HMS Gloucester formed part of a force of cruisers and destroyers charged with the duty of preventing the Italian convoys running from Greece to Crete.  On the morning of May 22nd 1941, a convoy was reported south of Milos and the British steamed to intercept it in the face of intensive bombing attacks by enemy dive-bombers.  HMS Gloucester, whilst assisting in the rescue of survivors from the water, was hit amidships by a heavy bomb and sank shortly afterwards off the island of Antikithera.  49 of her 50 officers and 687 of her 755 ratings were lost.  
U  12 On or about 5th Oct 1939 Submarine nominated by German Authorities to represent all others lost within UK jurisdiction.
HMS ARDENT North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31st May 1916 This Destroyer was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  HMS Ardent came under shell fire and sank leaving only 2 survivors.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS BLACK PRINCE North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The cruiser HMS Black Prince was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  Having fallen behind the fleet, she found herself close to the German centre.  She was hit by shell fire at point blank range and exploded killing 857 men.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS DEFENCE North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The cruiser HMS Defence was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  HMS Defence was hit by two heavy salvoes and the Admiral's flagship sank along with 903 men.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS FORTUNE North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 HMS Fortune, a destroyer, was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  After coming under heavy fire, HMS Fortune caught fire and sank. As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS INDEFATIGABLE North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The battlecruiser HMS Indefatigable was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  HMS Indefatigable sank when salvoes from the First Scouting Group penetrated her magazine. She sank with the loss of 1017 men.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS INVICIBLE North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The battlecruiser HMS Invincible was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  HMS Invincible was sunk by gunfire and 1026 men lost their lives.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS NESTOR North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 HMS Nestor was a destroyer and part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  HMS Nestor was sunk by gunfire. As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS NOMAD North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The destroyer, HMS Nomad was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland. HMS Nomad was sunk by gunfire.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS QUEEN MARY North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 HMS Queen Mary was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  HMS Queen Mary was sunk when a salvo hit her decks while she was engaging enemy battelcruisers with the loss of1257 men.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS SHARK North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The destroyer HMS Shark was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  HMS Shark was sunk by gunfire with the loss of 86 lives.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS SPARROWHAWK North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The destroyer HMS Sparrowhawk was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland. Having suffered damage to her steering gear during battle, the Sparrowhawk sank after being rammed by HMS Brake.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS TIPPERARY North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 HMS Tipperary, a destroyer, was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland. HMS Tipperary sank after coming under heavy gunfire.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS TURBULENT North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The destroyer HMS Turbulent was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  HMS Turbulent was rammed whilst crossing the enemy line.  She sank with the loss of 90 lives. As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS WARRIOR North Sea, off Jutland, Denmark 31 May 1916 The cruiser HMS Warrior was part of the British Grand Fleet under Admirals Jellicoe and Beatty and was lost during the Battle of Jutland.  Damaged in action, her bulkheads gave way and she sank whilst under tow.  As well as the British losses, 11 German warships were sunk during the battle and thousands of men lost their lives.
HMS ACHERON Off the Isle of Wight 17th Dec 1940 The destroyer HMS Acheron struck a mine and sank off the Isle of Wight with the loss of 151 men.
HMS BLACKWOOD Off the Dorset Coast 15th June 1944 A Captain class frigate on lease-lend from the United States. She was sunk by the submarine U764 with the loss of 58 lives.
HMS BOADICEA Off Portland, Dorset 13th June 1944 The destroyer HMS Boadicea was torpedoed and sunk by enemy aircraft with the loss of 175 lives.
HMS BULLEN North West Scotland 6th Dec 1944 The destroyer HMS Bullen sank with the loss of 71 men.
HMS EXMOOR Off Lowestoft 25th Feb 1941 HMS Exmoor, a estroyer was escorting a convoy off Lowestoft when she was attacked by E-boats.  She sank following an explosion with the loss of 104 men.
HMS K4 Isle of May, Firth of Forth 31st Jan 1918 The submarine K4 was taking part in an exercise off the Isle of May when, under radio silence and blackout conditions, she was hit by HMS K6 and nearly cut in half.  The two submarines sat locked together.  Approaching from the stern, HMS K7 spotted K6 and managed to avoid her but was unaware of K4 lying across her path.  The second hit proved fatal and K4 sank.  Nine men were rescued from the water but one died before he could receive medical attention.
HMS K17 Isle of May, Firth of Forth 31st Jan 1918 The submarine HMS K17 was rammed by the cruiser HMS Fearless during an exercise. K17 was hit forward of the conning tower and sank.
HMS M1 Off Start Point 12th Nov 1925 The submarine HMS M1 sank without trace on 12th November 1925 with the loss of 69 men. She was not discovered until 40 years later. The M1 may have been involved in a collision with the collier SS Vidar which caused her to sink, but this is not confirmed.
HMS M2 Off Portland, Dorset 26th Jan 1932 The aircraft carrier submaine HMS M2 sailed from Portland for a routine exercise and headed for a position 15 miles west of Portland Bill, where she was to rendevouz with other submarines.  Concerns were raised when she failed to arrive and search vessels were sent out.  M2 carried escape equipment and there was hope of survivors, but none were found.  The wreck was located and investigations in Feb 1932 revealed that the hangar door and hatch inside leading to the interior were open.  It is thought that she was about to launch an aircraft when she sank.
HMS SWORDFISH Off St Catherine's Point, Isle of Wight 7th Nov 1940 The submarine HMS Swordfish saild from Fort Blockhouse with the intention of relieving HMS Usk off Brest.  She disappeared without trace and was presumed to have struck a mine or been sunk by a German Destroyer.  The wreck of HMS Swordfish was located off the Isle of Wight in 1983.
HMS UMPIRE North Sea 19th July 1941 The submarine HMS Umpire was travelling as part of a convoy when she developed engine trouble and her escort drew ahead.  A southbound convoy appeared and, in an attempt to avoid a collision, she was struck by the escort trawler HMS Peter Hendriks on the starboard torpedo room.  The Commander and lookout floated free as she went down and others used Davis Submarine Apparatus. She sank with the loss of 22 lives.
HMS VANDAL Off Lochranza, Isle of Arran 24th Feb 1943 This U-class submarine left the Firth of Forth during the night of the 22nd Feb 1943 on passage for the submarine practice area between the Mull of Kintyre and the Isle of Arran.  HMS Vandal was last seen leaving Lochranza on the afternoon of the 24th. She failed to make her routine signal in Holy Loch and a search commenced at dawn the following day.  No trace of the missing submarine was found, her resting place and reason for loss remained a mystery.  The wreck was finally located in June 1994 by the minehunter HMS Hurworth.
HMS VORTIGERN Off Cromer 15th Mar 1942 HMS Vortigern was torpedoed whilst on escort duty and sank with the loss of 147 crew.
HMS WARWICK Off Trevose Head, Cornwall 20th Feb 1944 HMS Warwick was torpedoed and sunk by U413 whilst escorting a convoy of merchant ships.  She sank with the loss of 67 lives.
UB 65 Off Padstow, Cornwall On or about 14th July 1918 The UB 65 may have sunk following the premature explosion of one of its own torpedoes. It is thought to have sunk on or about the 14th July 1918 and was lost with all 37 crew.
ATLANTIC CONVEYOR Falkland Islands 25th May 1982 Hit by Exocet missile which caused uncontrollable fire. The ship was abandoned with the loss of 12 lives.
HMS AMPHION Off Harwich 6th August 1914 This scout cruiser struck two mines and sank. After striking the first mine, other vessels in the flotilla were able to rescue the survivors before the heavily damaged vessel drifted back into the minefield, struck a second mine and sank. Over 140 crew and some German prisoners were killed.
HMS CALGARIAN Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland 1st March 1918 Struck by four torpedoes and sank with the loss of 49 lives.
HMS CURACAO Northern Ireland 2nd Oct 1942 This C-Class light cruiser was escorting the RMS Queen Mary as she carried thousands of American troops. Whilst carrying out zigzagging manoeuvres, the Queen Mary struck HMS Curacoa, cutting her in two. Curacoa sank with the loss of c.300 lives.
HMS DELIGHT Portland, Dorset 29th July 1940 A D-Class destroyer was bombed by enemy aircraft which caused a major fire and subsequent explosion. She sank off Portland, Dorset, with the loss of six lives.
HMS DUKE OF ALBANY Orkney 26th August 1916 The Duke of Albany was acting as an armed boarding vessel when she was struck by a torpedo which set off her own depth charges, sinking the ship and killing 24 of her crew.
HMS FISGUARD II Portland, Dorset 17th Sept 1914 Foundered and sank whilst under tow with the loss of c.20 lives
HMS FITZROY Off Great Yarmouth 27th May 1942 A Hunt-Class minesweeper which struck a mine (possibly a British mine), and sank.
HMS GHURKA English Channel, Dungeness 8th February 1917 Part of the Dover Patrol, Ghurka struck a mine and sank, leaving only 12 survivors.
HMT KURD Off Lizard Point, Cornwall 10th July 1945 Lost after detonating a mine during mine clearance operations at the end of WWII.
HMS L24 Portland Bill, Dorset 10th January 1924 This L-Class submarine was lost with all hands (43) after colliding with the battleship HMS Resolution during exercises.
HMS LOYALTY English Channe 22nd August 1944 Whilst returning from Normandy to Portsmouth, the minesweeper HMS Loyalty was attacked and sunk by U-480 with the loss of 19 crew.
HMS MOURNE Off the Lizard, Cornwall 15th June 1944 Torpedoed and sunk by U-767 whilst patrolling in the English Channel with over 100 lives lost.
HMS PATHFINDER Off Eyemouth 5th Sept 1914 Whilst on patrol in the North Sea, Pathfinder was hit by a torpedo which probably detonated cordite charges, leading to a second massive explosion, sinking the ship and killing 250 of the crew.
HMS PENYLAN Start Point, Devon 3rd December 1942 This Hunt-Class destroyer was torpedoed and sunk by an E-boat whilst on escort duties off Start Point.
HMS VERVAIN Ireland, south of Waterford 20th February 1945 Whilst escorting a convoy, the Vervain was struck by a torpedo and sank with the loss of more than 50 lives.
SS MENDI St Catherine’s Point, Isle of Wight 21st February 1917 A passenger ship taken up as a troop transport. Whilst travelling in convoy with over 800 South African troops on board, the Mendi was struck by the SS Darro and sank with the loss of nearly 650 troops and crew.
SS STORAA English Channel, Hastings 3rd November 1943 The Storaa was being operated by the Ministry of War Transport and was travelling in convoy in the Channel when the vessel was hit by a torpedo and sank with the loss of 22 lives.

Wrecks protected under the Falkland Islands Protection of Wreck Ordinance 1977

Name of Wreck

Location

Date

History

HMS ARDENT Falklands Islands Falklands Conflict On May 21st 1982 the frigate HMS ARDENT came under repeated air attack and was hit several times by bombs and rockets.  On fire and expecting further attacks, the ship was abandoned.  She continued to burn and remain afloat for a further twelve hours before sinking.  22 men were killed and 37 wounded.
HMS ANTELOPE Falklands Islands Falklands Conflict On May 23rd 1982, during an air attack, the frigate HMS Antelope was hit by two 1,000 lb bombs, which lodged onboard unexploded, killing one man.  The ship moved up San Carlos water and anchored in Ajax Bay.  While attempts were being made to defuse one of the bombs, it exploded, killing another man and seriously injuring another.  A serious fire broke out and the ship was aban doned.  The fires raged throughout the night but the HMS Antelope was still afloat at dawn. Not long afterwards, however, another major explosion occurred (possibly the second 1,000 lb bomb).  The ship’s back broke and she sank with her bows and stern sticking out of the water.

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